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UPDATE: New actions

Twitch chat support

Thank you to everyone who joined the Discord for the original trial session. A lot was learned in a very short time! It was also great to see the progress made all the way to the end of the first stage.

A few notes were pulled from the original tech beta. First — input sources. Originally, Discord was originally chosen in favor of being less complex. With four channels, each targeting a player, it seemed that this would be a more sensible option for players to not have to specify their target player in each action.

A context switcher was originally considered within the application, but maintaining player<->chat context switching could prove painful should the bot restart. Persistent storage of this would have expanded the scope of the project and was undesirable. This was the original reason for no Twitch direct input support.

A number of player confusion and complaints against the lack of opportunity here was voiced. Listening to the concerns, I have decided to add this functionality to the chat, using a specification of player in the first argument field. (.e.g, previously, a command in a channel was issued with ACTION/DURATION). In Twitch, this is now CHARACTER/ACTION/DURATION.

As an example, to swing Green’s sword, you will need to use 1/B/100

It was found that many players wanted to jump right in by throwing commands. Directions, while available, were not often used. As such, a bot has been added to help accommodate for when player attempt invalid commands. Unfortunately, it is not exactly easy to determine input commands vs chat. For now, any message under 6 characters will trigger the bot to respond.

Command delays & Chaining

All commands sources will now support adding a delay. Commands can be chained in a single message using comma separation (e.g. 1/left/5000, 1/b/5000 ).

Originally, network delay was an issue when it came to some more complex actions. Particularly, pulling (grabbing with R, and holding back) were considered difficult actions to pull off in synchronization. If attempting to throw commands in rapid succession, network delay of chat parsing was often found to be painful. As such, a new argument, “delay” is optional at the end of commands. This allows you to send two commands in the same message that do not execute simultaneously, but in succession.

For example, to pull out Red Link’s sword and walk forward with it, you can do 2/b/5000, 2/left/5000/150